From the blogs: The Outside Guide to 2016

Outside-2016

From the blogs The Outside Guide to 2016 caught our eye

Well it is crystal ball time…

From new sports (bikepacking!) to epic expeditions (high school twins will make first descents in Antarctica!), we’re laying down 22 bold predictions about the people, trends, and gear that will shape our world in 2016…

Read The Outside Guide to 2016

This prompted us to look into our crystal ball. We thought we would ask all our Readers to look into their crystal ball and share with us what they see for Outdoor and Travel world 2016…

To get you started:

Andrew Denton – Outdoor Recreation in the UK 

Please add your’s in the comments below…

History and Memories of Rohan Clothing

One Comment

  1. Peter Clinch says:

    “Bikepacking” isn’t anything close to new, it’s just got trendier and got a snappy name. The Rough Stuff Fellowship certainly didn’t invent it, and they’ve been going since the Fifties!

    Much of what the Outside have is couched in revolutionary terms, but outdoors matters tend not to be that revolutionary in practice. Typically, a few people take them up, it’s touted as the Next Big Thing, it’s found to have some useful answers that are folded back in to the mainstream but not actually as revolutionary or big as forecast. So, for example, we’re generally travelling lighter these days, but we’re still defaulting to tents and sleeping bags rather than tarps and quilts. Several generations of revolutionary breathable waterproof fabric in, we’re still getting a bit damp (from both inside and out) after a day in the rain.

    That Bikepacking will displace backpacking… well, up to a point, Lord Copper. A beauty of backpacking is you don’t need any particular skill to do it and not much in the way of specialist gear, so much as sea kayaking is far more popular now than when I took it up at the back end of the 90s, despite its boost in the Noughties as the Big New Outdoor Black it’s still a minority sport for people willing to spend money and develop specialised skills.

    I think Andrew’s parting point is a key one. Things will evolve according to organic choice, rather than revolutions selected for us by enthusiastic magazine editors.

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